Gattex approved for short bowel syndrome

Gattex approved for short bowel syndrome
Gattex (teduglutide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat nutritional problems caused by short bowel syndrome.

(HealthDay)—Gattex (teduglutide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat nutritional problems caused by short bowel syndrome.

Gattex is a once-daily injection that helps improve intestinal absorption. Two other drugs, somatropin and glutamine, have been FDA-approved to help treat short bowel disorder.

People who take Gattex may be at increased risk of developing colon cancer, , gallbladder disease, biliary tract disease, or pancreatic disease, the agency said.

The drug was evaluated in two clinical studies and two extension studies. The most common side effects reported were abdominal pain, injection site reactions, nausea, headache, and upper .

Gattex is marketed by NPS Pharmaceuticals, based in Bedminster, N.J.

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PeterD
1 / 5 (1) Dec 23, 2012
Idiots at work.