Spine education seems ineffective in pain prevention

Spine education seems ineffective in pain prevention
Educational interventions, mainly focused on a biomechanical/biomedical model, do not seem to be effective in preventing low back pain, according to a review published in the December issue of the European Spine Journal.

(HealthDay)—Educational interventions, mainly focused on a biomechanical/biomedical model, do not seem to be effective in preventing low back pain, according to a review published in the December issue of the European Spine Journal.

Christophe Demoulin, from the University of Liège in Belgium, and colleagues conducted a literature review to examine the efficacy of preventive , focusing on a biomechanical/biomedical model, for low back pain. Nine , all conducted at the workplace, were included, which studied the efficacy on outcomes related to low back pain.

The researchers found that the mean quality level was low (5.1/12), and of four large studies (sample size more than 400 subjects) only one had acceptable (6/12). There was wide variation in the education interventions between the studies. During follow-up, in eight of the nine studies, there were no significant differences seen on the incidence of back pain, disability, and sick leave in the education group versus controls.

"The results of the randomized controlled trials included in this review suggest that educational interventions mainly focused on a biomechanical/biomedical model are not effective in preventing ," the authors write. "Additional high-quality studies with a longer education period are needed to conclude that such interventions are inefficient."

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Shootist
Dec 10, 2012
Spine education seems ineffective in pain prevention


And there are otherwise reasonable people who are actually surprised by this result?

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