Standardized blood culture process reduces contamination

Standardized blood culture process reduces contamination
Introduction of a standardized sterile collection process for blood cultures can reduce peripheral blood culture contamination rates and hospital charges, according to research published online Dec. 3 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Introduction of a standardized sterile collection process for blood cultures can reduce peripheral blood culture contamination rates and hospital charges, according to research published online Dec. 3 in Pediatrics.

Randon T. Hall, M.D., from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues designed a sterile blood culture collection process for use in the , information about which they disseminated using a Web-based educational model. All members of the nursing staff were subsequently expected to use the modified sterile technique to perform peripheral blood cultures.

The researchers found that, during the intervention period, the peripheral blood culture contamination rate dropped significantly, from 3.9 percent at baseline to 1.6 percent. This was accompanied by estimated yearly savings of about $250,000 in .

"Blood culture collection via a standardized intravenous catheterization process performed by using sterile technique was effective in reducing peripheral blood culture contamination rates and unnecessary utilization of resources," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Better prognosis for early blast clearance in leukemia

date Oct 24, 2012

(HealthDay)—Patients with acute myeloid leukemia whose peripheral blood blasts clear in six days or less after chemotherapy have significantly better survival than patients whose peripheral blasts clear ...

Recommended for you

Are our schools damaging children's eyes?

date Mar 24, 2015

Shockingly, research has shown a dramatic increase in the number of students leaving secondary school with short-sightedness, or myopia, and a new study published in the Journal Perspectives in Public Health, published by SAG ...

Vitamin D vital for gene expression in developing brains

date Mar 24, 2015

Vitamin D deficiency in mothers leading up to and during pregnancy has fundamental consequences for their offspring's brain development, researchers from University of Western Australia and the Telethon Kids ...

Chef-enhanced school meals increase healthy food consumption

date Mar 23, 2015

Schools collaborating with a professionally trained chef to improve the taste of healthy meals significantly increased students' fruit and vegetable consumption, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.