Program helps veterans reintegrate through music

by Samantha Henry
In this Oct. 10, 2012, photo, musician Julio Fernandez holds a guitar during a class session at Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J. Students are participating in a music class for service men and women that helps them cope with their life after the military through a program called Voices of Valor. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

(AP)—Many military veterans say having music to listen to helps them deal with the stress of deployment.

A new program hopes that music can play the same role in helping them readjust to civilian life.

In this Oct. 10, 2012, photo, songwriter Jennifer Lampert, right, writes down lyrics during a class session at Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J. Students are participating in a music class for service men and women that helps them cope with their life after the military through a program called Voices of Valor. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

A called Voices of Valor is being offered this year through the veteran affairs program at Montclair State University.

It's open to veterans of any age, and participants don't need prior .

This Oct. 10, 2012, photo shows a key chain belonging to U.S. Navy Petty Officer Mike Cordes during a class session at Montclair State University, in Montclair, N.J. Cordes, a justice studies student, is participating in a music class for service men and women that helps them cope with their life after the military through a program called Voices of Valor. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Participants are guided by professional musicians and psychology mentors through a process of synthesizing their military experiences into song. They write a tune as a group, record it in a professional sound studio and then hold a CD release party.

Some participants say the program is more effective than traditional "talk therapy."

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study identifies factors related to violence in veterans

Jun 25, 2012

A national survey identifies which U.S. military veterans may be at most risk of aggression after deployment and what strategies could potentially help reduce likelihood of violence when service members return home.

Listening to music is biological

Feb 25, 2011

Our willingness to listen to music is biological trait and related to the neurobiological pathways affecting social affiliation and communication, suggests a recent Finnish study published in the Journal of Human Genetics.

Agreement boosts access for American Indian vets

Dec 06, 2012

(AP)—Native American military veterans will be able to access health care closer to home thanks to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs and the Indian Health Service.

Recommended for you

Giving emotions to virtual characters

10 hours ago

Researchers at the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico (UAEM) were able to simulate human facial expressions in virtual characters and use them in order to create better environments within a virtual ...

Emotion-tracking software aims for "mood-aware" internet

10 hours ago

Emotions can be powerful for individuals. But they're also powerful tools for content creators, such as advertisers, marketers, and filmmakers. By tracking people's negative or positive feelings toward ads—via ...

The emotional appeal of stand-up comedy

11 hours ago

Comics taking to the stage at the Edinburgh Fringe this week should take note: how much of a hit they are with their audiences won't be down to just their jokes. As Dr Tim Miles from the University of Surrey has discovered, ...

User comments