Program helps veterans reintegrate through music

December 28, 2012 by Samantha Henry
In this Oct. 10, 2012, photo, musician Julio Fernandez holds a guitar during a class session at Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J. Students are participating in a music class for service men and women that helps them cope with their life after the military through a program called Voices of Valor. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

(AP)—Many military veterans say having music to listen to helps them deal with the stress of deployment.

A new program hopes that music can play the same role in helping them readjust to civilian life.

In this Oct. 10, 2012, photo, songwriter Jennifer Lampert, right, writes down lyrics during a class session at Montclair State University in Montclair, N.J. Students are participating in a music class for service men and women that helps them cope with their life after the military through a program called Voices of Valor. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

A called Voices of Valor is being offered this year through the veteran affairs program at Montclair State University.

It's open to veterans of any age, and participants don't need prior .

This Oct. 10, 2012, photo shows a key chain belonging to U.S. Navy Petty Officer Mike Cordes during a class session at Montclair State University, in Montclair, N.J. Cordes, a justice studies student, is participating in a music class for service men and women that helps them cope with their life after the military through a program called Voices of Valor. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Participants are guided by professional musicians and psychology mentors through a process of synthesizing their military experiences into song. They write a tune as a group, record it in a professional sound studio and then hold a CD release party.

Some participants say the program is more effective than traditional "talk therapy."

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