AAP endorses parental leave for pediatric residents

January 29, 2013
AAP endorses parental leave for pediatric residents
The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates that all interns, residents, and fellows should have parental leave benefits consistent with the Family Medical Leave Act during pediatric training, according to a policy statement published online Jan. 28 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advocates that all interns, residents, and fellows should have parental leave benefits consistent with the Family Medical Leave Act during pediatric training, according to a policy statement published online Jan. 28 in Pediatrics.

Jill J. Fussell, M.D., along with colleagues from the AAP's Section on , Residents, and Fellowship Trainees and the Committee on Early Childhood, reviewed the parental leave policies that are in place for residency programs.

According to the report, each residency program should have an easily-accessible written policy, delineating the practices regarding parental leave. The parental leave policies should conform legally to the Family Medical Leave Act and , and should meet the institutional requirements of the for accredited programs. Residents who become parents, regardless of gender, should be guaranteed a minimum of six to eight weeks of parental leave with pay after the infant's birth. The resident should also be allowed to extend the leave time when necessary by using paid or leave without pay, consistent with federal law. The same amount of paid leave (six to eight weeks) should be granted to residents, regardless of gender, who are co-parenting, adopting, or fostering a child.

"The AAP is committed to the development of rational, equitable, and effective parental leave policies that are sensitive to the needs of pediatric residents, families, and developing infants and that enable parents to spend adequate and good-quality time with their young children," the authors write.

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