Eating asparagus may prevent a hangover, study finds

Drinking to ring in the New Year may leave many suffering with the dreaded hangover. According to a 2009 study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), the amino acids and minerals found in asparagus extract may alleviate alcohol hangover and protect liver cells against toxins.

Researchers at the Institute of Medical Science and Jeju National University in Korea analyzed the components of young asparagus shoots and leaves to compare their biochemical effects on human and rat . "The amino acid and mineral contents were found to be much higher in the leaves than the shoots," says lead researcher B.Y. Kim.

Chronic alcohol use causes oxidative stress on the liver as well as unpleasant physical effects associated with a hangover. "Cellular toxicities were significantly alleviated in response to treatment with the extracts of asparagus leaves and shoots," says Kim. "These results provide evidence of how the biological functions of asparagus can help alleviate alcohol hangover and protect liver cells."

Asparagus officinalis is a common vegetable that is widely consumed worldwide and has long been used as an herbal medicine due to its . It also has antifungal, anti-inflammatory and diuretic properties.

More information: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10… 009.01263.x/abstract

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tadchem
not rated yet Jan 03, 2013
"Eating asparagus may prevent a hangover..."
So will hyperhydration. 'Hangovers' are caused by dehydration as the body tries to dilute the ethanol sufficiently for metabolizing it. A large glass of water or weak tea (24-32 fluid ounces) just before retiring will insure the body is not dehydrated as you sleep it off.