US cancer death rates continue to decline, national report finds

A report from the nation's leading cancer organizations shows rates of death in the United States from all cancers for men and women continued to decline between 2000 and 2009. The findings come from the latest Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer.

The report also finds that during the same period the overall cancer incidence rate for men decreased and remained stable for women. Among children ages 14 years or younger, the report shows cancer incidence rates increased 0.6 percent per each year from 1992 through 2009. However, considerable progress has been seen for many types of , resulting in overall declines in death rates for cancer among children since at least 1975.

Edward J. Benz, Jr., MD, president of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, called the news encouraging, but says the overall number of cancer incidences and mortality rates are not falling nearly enough.

"Cancer rates are declining, continuing a trend that started some years ago. People are surviving more and we are getting better at preventing some cancers," said Benz. "But we're not taking advantage of all the ways to detect cancers at an early stage when they can be the most curable."

The report is co-authored by researchers from the , the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the National Cancer Institute, and the . It will be published in the Journal of the (print issue 3, volume 105) and will appear on the journal's website on Monday, Jan. 7.

In a special feature section, the authors also showed an increase in the incidence rate of (HPV)-associated cancers, including head and neck cancers. The authors highlighted the important role of vaccination in the prevention of both cervical and non-cervical HPV-associated cancers.

"We are seeing a large number of patients with HPV-associated and these patients are relatively young, are typically non-smokers and quite often have children," said Robert I. Haddad, MD, chief of Dana-Farber's head and neck oncology program. "HPV is a cause of many cancers, so it is really important to support endeavors to vaccinate."

Benz noted that the good news is that utilizing these prevention strategies, such as vaccinations for HPV, can have a big impact on incidence and death rates.

"Many of the things that are still a problem in these statistics can be changed," said Benz.

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nanotech_republika_pl
not rated yet Jan 08, 2013
My guess on causes for cancer death rates to fall in US: the falling rate of smoking (direct and second-hand). But on the other side there is a decline in food quality people eat, maybe especially kids. And when it comes to kids, increasing the rate of the computer play to the outdoor play.

It is all about toxins influencing epigenetic makeup of the cells in the human body and genetic damage.

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