More research into chronic diseases urgently needed in all countries

January 29, 2013

When considering chronic (non-communicable) diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, in low-and-middle countries, a major shift in approach from declaring what needs to be done to using research to prioritise, evaluate, monitor and improve health outcomes is urgently needed, according to international experts from London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine writing in this week's PLOS Medicine.

The authors, led by Shah Ebrahim, also from the South Asian Network for Chronic Disease in India, make a strong case for conducting research in the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases in all (high-income and low- and middle-income) for mutual benefit. Currently, research into non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries is limited, and despite repeated calls for action, the burden from these diseases is increasing unchecked.

The authors say: "Global and local research, particularly if it can be conducted in parallel in high-income countries and middle- and low-income countries, can provide powerful arguments for the need to act globally."

Non-communicable disease research in high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries has other mutual advantages, such as discovering new causes of non-communicable diseases, replicating and extending findings, and exploring links between infectious diseases and non-communicable diseases.

Also, different non-communicable diseases are at varying stages of needing research, policy development, and action. These stages range from not knowing the population burden of many non-communicable diseases to knowing all that is necessary to take action.

The authors argue for changes in the global and national funding agendas to strengthen the research and health system capacity for non-communicable diseases, which should reduce deaths and disability.

The authors say: "The time has now come for all health-related research and development funders—global, regional, and national— to acknowledge the existence of non-communicable diseases and rise to the challenges they present."

Explore further: UN summit on non-communicable diseases should learn from global AIDS response

More information: Ebrahim S, Pearce N, Smeeth L, Casas JP, Jaffar S, et al. (2013) Tackling Non-Communicable Diseases In Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Is the Evidence from High-Income Countries All We Need? PLoS Med 10(1): e1001377. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001377

Related Stories

Non-communicable diseases having devastating global impact

August 30, 2012

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes are no longer just a problem in wealthy nations – the rate of NCDs in low-to-middle income countries are increasing faster than in developed countries.

Recommended for you

Clock controls junk food appeal

July 22, 2016

When it comes to extra kilojoules, a little more self-restraint won't go astray as the day progresses. New research from Flinders University and Liverpool University has studied the urge to snack more later in the day, even ...

Diagnoses: When are several opinions better than one?

July 22, 2016

Methods of collective intelligence can result in considerably more accurate medical diagnoses, but only under certain conditions. A study headed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development has shed new ...

How to increase the fat burned during exercise

July 19, 2016

During exercise, oxidation of fat and carbohydrates depends on the intensity and duration of the activity. A new study analyses the effect of consuming an alkaloid, p-synephrine, on the burning of lipids and refutes the value ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.