3-D biomimetic scaffolds support regeneration of complex tissues from stem cells

©2013, Mary Ann Liebert Inc., publishers

Stem cells can be grown on biocompatible scaffolds to form complex tissues such as bone, cartilage, and muscle for repair and regeneration of damaged or diseased tissue. However, to function properly, the cells must often grow in a specific pattern or alignment. An innovative method for creating a stretched polymer scaffold that can support complex tissue architectures is described in an article in Tissue Engineering, Part C, Methods.

Zu-yong Wang and a team of researchers from National University of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, in Singapore, developed a reproducible method that involves stretching a polymer thin film to produce scaffolds that can support the growth of human . The stretching process creates orientated 3-dimensional micro-grooves on the surface of the films, and these formations promote consistent alignment and elongation of stem cells as they grow and develop into tissues on and around the resorbable scaffold.

The authors present their work in the article, "Biomimetic 3D anisotropic geometries by uniaxial stretch of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) films for mesenchymal stem cell proliferation, alignment and myogenic differentiation."

"The researchers developed a very elegant method to promote ," says John Jansen, DDS, PhD, Methods Co-Editor-in-Chief and Professor and Chairman, Department of Biomaterials, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, The Netherlands.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Extracting stem cells from fat for tissue regeneration

May 03, 2011

Stem cells extracted from body fat may pave the way for the development of new regenerative therapies including soft tissue reconstruction following tumor removal or breast mastectomy surgery, the development of tissue-engineered ...

Dutch researcher develops new method of stem cell culture

May 21, 2010

Deborah Schop of the University of Twente, The Netherlands, and the MIRA research institute has developed a new method of stem cell culture. With the new method Schop can cultivate stem cells in a closed system. This means ...

Recommended for you

Biologists reprogram skin cells to mimic rare disease

6 hours ago

Johns Hopkins stem cell biologists have found a way to reprogram a patient's skin cells into cells that mimic and display many biological features of a rare genetic disorder called familial dysautonomia. ...

Student seeks to improve pneumonia vaccines

Aug 20, 2014

Almost a million Americans fall ill with pneumonia each year. Nearly half of these cases require hospitalization, and 5-7 percent are fatal. Current vaccines provide protection against some strains of the ...

Seabed solution for cold sores

Aug 20, 2014

The blue blood of abalone, a seabed delicacy could be used to combat common cold sores and related herpes virus following breakthrough research at the University of Sydney.

User comments