Drug abuse impairs sexual performance in men even after rehabilitation

Researchers at the University of Granada, Spain, and Santo Tomas University in Colombia have found that drug abuse negatively affects sexual performance in men even after years of abstinence. This finding contradicts other studies reporting that men spontaneously recovered their normal sexual performance at three weeks after quitting substance abuse.

The results of this study have been published in the prestigious Journal of Sexual Medicine, the official journal of the International Society for . The authors of this paper are Pablo Vallejo Medina –a professor at Santo Tomas University, Colombia– and Juan Carlos Sierra, a professor at the University of Granada.

In this study, the researchers assessed the sexual performance of 605 men, of which 550 had been diagnosed with alcohol, cocaine, cocaine and alcohol, heroin, marihuana and speedball (cocaine and heroin) addiction. The remaining 356 men were included as controls.

Assessing Four Areas

The researchers examined and evaluated four areas of sexual performance: sexual desire, , sexual arousal and orgasm. The study revealed that the study group had a moderately to significantly impaired sexual performance as compared to controls.

Additionally, the researchers separately examined the effects of the different substances on sexuality. For instance, speedball and prevailingly affect sexual pleasure, while they slightly affect sexual desire. Indeed, have very high during peak periods of drug abuse.

Alcohol is the drug which most affects sexual arousal (erectile capacity). This is the first study to reveal the permanent effect of substance abuse on sexuality, even after long abstinence periods. Finally, orgasms are prevailingly impaired by heroin, cocaine, alcohol and speedball.

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Argiod
1 / 5 (1) Jan 17, 2013
And now tell us the likelihood of that lack of sex is what made these men turn to drugs in the first place? If you can't get one form of pleasure, you're likely to seek out another. And drugs are more readily available and, in the short term, cheaper.