Drug approved for inherited blood disorder

(HealthDay)—Exjade (deferasirox) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to remove excess iron in the blood among people with a genetic blood disorder called non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT).

Too much iron in the blood can damage vital organs, the agency said Wednesday in a news release.

Thalassemia typically leads to the production of fewer and less hemoglobin, a protein that carries oxygen throughout the body. NTDT is a milder form of thalassemia that unlike other forms, does not require frequent blood transfusions. Thalassemia affects about 1,000 people in the United States, the FDA said.

The FDA previously approved Exjade to treat chronic iron overload among people who require blood transfusions.

The drug is produced by Novartis, East Hanover, N.J.

More information: The U.S. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has more about thalassemia.

More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Blood protein offers help against anemia

Jan 26, 2010

A new study shows that a protein found in blood alleviates anemia, a condition in which the body's tissues don't get enough oxygen from the blood. In this animal study, injections of the protein, known as transferrin, also ...

MIT uncovers key blood protein

Oct 11, 2007

Scientists working in the only lab at MIT doing hematology research have uncovered a protein that plays a key role in the recycling of iron from blood.

Recommended for you

WHO: Millions of Ebola vaccine doses ready in 2015

Oct 24, 2014

The World Health Organization says millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines will start being tested in March.

Added benefit of vedolizumab is not proven

Oct 23, 2014

Vedolizumab (trade name Entyvio) has been approved since May 2014 for patients with moderately to severely active Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis. In an early benefit assessment pursuant to the Act on the Reform of the ...

Seaweed menace may yield new medicines

Oct 22, 2014

An invasive seaweed clogging up British coasts could be a blessing in disguise. University of Greenwich scientists have won a cash award to turn it into valuable compounds which can lead to new, life-saving drugs.

User comments