Emerging antibiotic resistance in Listeria

Credit: sarosiek99 C.C

Malaysian researchers have revealed the presence of multidrug-resistant strains of Listeria monocytogenes in frozen burger patties taken from supermarkets and other retail shops in Malaysia. The research was published in Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science.

A recent publication by W.C. Wong and colleagues in the Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science revealed the presence of multidrug- of Listeria monocytogenes in frozen burger patties taken from supermarkets and other retail shops in Malaysia.

The results also suggested that the overall incidence of in L. monocytogenes is relatively low, and that most of the isolated from food are susceptible to antibiotics commonly used in veterinary and human therapy.

Often found in raw foods, L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis when ingested. Symptoms may range from gastrointestinal upset to headaches, fever and, in severe cases, and/or blood poisoning. Those at highest risk include pregnant women, newborns and the elderly, as well as people with .

Early diagnosis of listeriosis increases the likelihood of applying appropriate before serious consequences occur. The most commonly used antibiotics for treating Listeria infections are ampicillin, penicillin, trimethoprim, tetracycline, erythromycin and gentamicin.

In this study, researchers examined the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes isolated from raw beef, chicken and vegetarian patties to 11 different antibiotics. Thirteen out of 41 bacteria samples or isolates were not resistant to any of the antibiotics, while 28 were resistant to at least one. Moreover, 19 out of 41 isolates showed resistance to at least two antibiotics. The most common form of antibiotic resistance was tetracycline resistance, followed by erythromycin resistance. However, none of the 41 isolates were resistant to imipenem or gentamicin.

Antibiotic-resistant L. monocytogenes strains were first reported in 1988. The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is accelerating worldwide, partly due to the over-prescription of drugs in clinical settings and the heavy use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock husbandry.

The authors recommend the continuous monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in L. monoctyogenes to assure the ongoing effectiveness of listeriosis treatment.

More information: Wong et al. Antibiogram Pattern among Cultures of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Frozen Burger Patties in Malaysia, JTAS Vol. 35 (4) Nov. 2012. www.pertanika.upm.edu.my/Perta… 20Page%20793-804.pdf

Related Stories

Roads pave the way for the spread of superbugs

date Sep 29, 2011

Antibiotic resistant E. coli was much more prevalent in villages situated along roads than in rural villages located away from roads, which suggests that roads play a major role in the spread or containment of antibiotic resist ...

New antibiotic beats superbugs at their own game

date Jul 03, 2008

The problem with antibiotics is that, eventually, bacteria outsmart them and become resistant. But by targeting the gene that confers such resistance, a new drug may be able to finally outwit them. Rockefeller ...

Recommended for you

Fighting back against superbugs

date 1 hour ago

Antibiotics—and antibiotic resistance—are in the news once again, with announcements by McDonald's and Costco that they will eliminate antibiotics that are important to human medicine from use in the ...

Harnessing the power of microbes as therapeutics

date 2 hours ago

A new report recently released by the American Academy of Microbiology discusses how specific microbes can be modified to enhance their therapeutic potential for treating human diseases such as cancer and antibiotic resistant ...

New genetic link found for alcohol-related liver cirrhosis

date 2 hours ago

In most people, any liver damage that might occur from drinking alcohol is reversible. However, in 25 to 30 percent of alcoholics what begins as accumulation of fat in the liver progresses to inflammation, fibrosis and ultimately ...

Could camel antibodies protect humans from MERS?

date 2 hours ago

Antibodies from dromedary camels protected uninfected mice from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and helped infected mice expunge the disease, according to a study published online March 18th in the ...

Sierra Leone ends anti-Ebola lockdown after three days

date 6 hours ago

Sierra Leoneans were once again allowed to leave their homes Sunday evening after the government announced the end of a three-day nationwide lockdown aimed at preventing a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.