Flu season came early but too soon to say it's bad

January 10, 2013 by Mike Stobbe
Vials of flu vaccine are displayed at Philly Flu Shots on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013 in Philadelphia. The flu season arrived early in the U.S. this year, but health officials and experts say it's too early to say this will be a bad one. Experts say evidence so far is pointing to a moderate flu season - it just looks worse because last year's season was so mild. Flu usually doesn't blanket the country until late January or February. Now, it's already widespread in more than 40 states. That could change when the next government report comes out Friday. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

The flu season arrived early in the U.S. this year, but health officials and experts say it's too early to say this will be a bad one.

Experts say evidence so far is pointing to a moderate —it just looks worse because last year's season was so mild.

Flu usually doesn't blanket the country until late January or February. Now, it's already widespread in more than 40 states. That could change when the next government report comes out Friday.

Pam Horn administers the flu vaccine to employee Michael Karolitzky at Philly Flu Shots on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, in Philadelphia. The flu season arrived early in the U.S. this year, but health officials and experts say it's too early to say this will be a bad one. Experts say evidence so far is pointing to a moderate flu season - it just looks worse because last year's season was so mild. Flu usually doesn't blanket the country until late January or February. Now, it's already widespread in more than 40 states. That could change when the next government report comes out Friday. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

There are a few factors complicating the situation. The main this year tends to make people sicker. And there are other bugs out there causing flu-like illnesses. So what some people are calling the flu may, in fact, be something else.

Explore further: Mutation in strains make flu a moving target

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geraldkeister
not rated yet Jan 11, 2013
Obviously you have not been watching the news on television.

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