Study finds knee replacement surgery may lead to weight gain

Patients who undergo knee replacement surgery may be at risk of gaining more weight than their peers who have not had the surgery, according to a five-year study led by a Virginia Commonwealth University professor.

Daniel Riddle, Ph.D., professor in the VCU Department of Physical Therapy in the School of Allied Health Professions, and his research team reviewed the medical records of nearly 1,000 patients from the Mayo Clinic Health System and found that 30 percent of them gained 5 percent or more of their body weight in five years following surgery.

In a comparison group of people who had not had surgery, only 20 percent gained equivalent amounts of weight during the same period.

"Part of the explanation is that people may have spent years adapting to their circumstances by avoiding activities that could cause knee pain," Riddle said. "We need to encourage patients to take advantage of their ability to function better and offer strategies for weight loss or weight management."

The study also shows that preoperative weight loss is a risk factor that frequently leads to weight gain following the procedure.

Overweight and preparing for surgery are frequently encouraged to lose weight prior to surgery to aid in enhancing early recovery and reduce the risk of complications.

"The subsequent weight gain potentially puts patients at risk of developing , such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes," said Riddle.

More information: The study is published online in the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Knee replacement not an 'easy solution' for obese patients

Oct 24, 2012

Obese patients have a greater risk of complications following total knee replacement surgery, including post-surgical infections, according to a new literature review recently published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Su ...

Recommended for you

Prompt diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis crucial

17 hours ago

Research led by Conway Fellow, Professor Oliver FitzGerald in St Vincent's University Hospital shows that a delay of more than 6 months from initial symptoms to a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis leads to poorer outcomes ...

Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis

Oct 20, 2014

Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a jour ...

Arthritis sufferers excluded from everyday life

Oct 13, 2014

Arthritis is the second leading cause of disability in Australia with many sufferers so severely disabled they cannot engage in basic everyday activities, new UNSW research has found.

User comments