Lumbar extensor training improves chronic back pain

Lumbar extensor training improves chronic back pain
An exercise regimen can improve functional status for men with chronic nonspecific low back pain without improving low back muscular morphology, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

(HealthDay)—An exercise regimen can improve functional status for men with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNSLBP) without improving low back muscular morphology, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

Martin J. Willemink , M.D., from St. Antonius Hospital in Nieuwegein, Netherlands, and colleagues assessed the effect of a dynamic isolated resistance-training program for the lower back muscles comprising approximately 10 sessions in 12 weeks for 16 with CNSLBP. The frequency of additional training over the next 12 weeks was tailored to patient need. Lumbar (MRI) was performed at baseline, at 12 weeks (T12), and after 24 weeks (T24). The patient-specific functional scale, Roland-Morris disability questionnaire, and global perceived effect scale were used to assess functional status.

The researchers identified significant and clinically relevant improvements from baseline to T12 in the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (44 percent) and patient specific functional scale score (39 percent). There was no significant change in the scores between T12 and T24. At T12, seven participants (44 percent) reported clinically relevant improvements in global perceived effect, and at T24, one more patient reported an improvement and two reported worsening of their condition. Minor non-significant changes in functional cross-sectional area were seen on analysis of MRI.

"Our study shows that 10 weeks of dynamic isolated training of the lumbar extensors, once a week, leads to clinically relevant improvements in functional status of men with CNSLBP, without accompanying improvements in functional cross-sectional area of lumbar multifidus," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Surgery center influences outcomes in spinal surgery

Oct 26, 2012

(HealthDay)—Choice of surgery center affects patient outcomes following surgery for lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Spine.

Rest versus exercise: Equally effective on lower back pain

Feb 28, 2012

Lower back pain due to Modic changes can be hard to treat and the currently recommended therapy of exercise and staying active often does not help alleviate the pain. Results of a trial, published in BioMed Central's open ...

Recommended for you

Thyroid disease risk varies among blacks, Asians, and whites

14 hours ago

An analysis that included active military personnel finds that the rate of the thyroid disorder Graves disease is more common among blacks and Asian/Pacific Islanders compared with whites, according to a study in the April ...

The key to easy asthma diagnosis is in the blood

17 hours ago

Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma.

Younger adults hit hardest this flu season

19 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The H1N1 flu was the predominant influenza strain in the United States this year, but it packed a lot less punch than in 2009 when it caused a worldwide pandemic, health officials report.

User comments