Your medical chart could include exercise minutes

by Lindsey Tanner
In this Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012 photo, Zendi Solano, center, trains with running club members Rian Barrett, second from right, and Richard Chen in Pasadena, Calif. Dr. Robert Sallis says some patients may not be aware that research shows physical inactivity is riskier than high blood pressure, obesity and other health risks people know they should avoid. As recently as November 2012, a government-led study concluded that people who routinely exercise live longer than others, even if they're overweight. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

(AP)—Most people know the usual vital signs, like blood pressure, temperature and pulse. But what about exercise?

There's a movement afoot to add questions about exercise to the list of routine checks done at the start of most . That means putting the minutes you exercise weekly at the top of your medical chart along with other vital signs.

Doctors who support the idea say it emphasizes that is riskier than , obesity and other health risks.

It started a few years ago at Kaiser Permanente in Southern California and has spread to Kaiser plans in other states. Other health systems from Utah to Illinois have adopted the idea or plan to this year.

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