Meniscal repair failure about 23 percent after five years

January 9, 2013
Meniscal repair failure about 23 percent after five years
The long-term rate of failure after meniscal repair is similar for all techniques, with a pooled rate of 23.1 percent, according to a review published in the Dec. 19 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

(HealthDay)—The long-term rate of failure after meniscal repair is similar for all techniques, with a pooled rate of 23.1 percent, according to a review published in the Dec. 19 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Jeffrey J. Nepple, M.D., of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of 13 studies to investigate the long-term outcomes of meniscal repair at a minimum of five years post-surgery.

The researchers found that the pooled rate of meniscal repair failure, defined as either reoperation or clinical failure, was 23.1 percent, and varied from 20.2 to 24.3 percent based on the status of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), the meniscus repaired, and the technique utilized. Failure rates were similar for the medial (24.2 percent) and lateral (20.2 percent) meniscus and for those with an intact or reconstructed ACL.

"A systematic review of the outcomes of meniscal repair at greater than five years postoperatively demonstrated very similar rates of meniscal failure (22.3 to 24.3 percent) for all techniques investigated," the authors write. "The outcomes of meniscal repair at greater than five years postoperatively have not yet been reported for modern all-inside repair devices."

One or more authors disclosed financial ties with an entity in the biomedical arena.

Explore further: Delaying ACL reconstruction in kids may lead to higher rates of associated knee injuries

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Scientists program robot for 'soft tissue' surgery

May 5, 2016

Not even the surest surgeon's hand is quite as steady and consistent as a robotic arm built of metal and plastic, programmed to perform the same motions over and over. So could it handle the slippery stuff of soft tissues ...

Outside the body, a heart beats via life-saving system

September 1, 2015

(Medical Xpress)—A system that enables heart transplants involving hearts that stopped beating in the donor's body continues to save lives. The Organ Care System (OCS) has been used in UK hospitals with good results.

Pig hearts may save human lives: researchers

April 5, 2016

One day, cardiac patients may enjoy a new lease on life with pig hearts beating in their chests, said researchers reporting a major advance Tuesday in cross-species organ transplantation.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.