Most physicians do not meet Medicare quality reporting requirements

A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study shows that fewer than one-in-five healthcare providers meet Medicare Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) requirements. Those that meet PQRS thresholds now receive a .5 percent Medicare bonus payment. In 2015, bonuses will be replaced by penalties for providers who do not meet PQRS requirements. As it stands, more than 80 percent of providers nationwide would face these penalties.

Researchers analyzed 2007-2010 PQRS program data and found that nearly 24 percent of eligible qualified for PQRS incentives in 2010—compared to 16 percent for other providers. The Neiman Institute study is published online in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

"Near term improvements in documentation and reporting are necessary to avert widespread physician penalties. As it stands, in 2016, radiologists collectively may face penalties totaling more than $100 Million. Although not a specific part of this analysis, penalties for nonradiologists could total well over $1 Billion," said Richard Duszak, MD, and senior research fellow of the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute. "Compliance with PQRS requirements has improved each year but more physicians need to act now: their performance in 2013 will dictate penalties for 2015."

More information: www.jacr.org/article/S1546-144… (12)00473-5/fulltext

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Clinical trial reduces stress of cancer caregivers

date 14 hours ago

Stem cell transplant is essential in the care of many blood cancers, but leaves patients requiring in-home care for months after. Frequently the role of caregiver falls to family or other committed members ...

Video: Debunking three common food myths

date 15 hours ago

You might have heard that microwaving your food is dangerous. Maybe your health nut friend told you that eating frozen veggies is less healthful than eating fresh ones. Is a glass of red wine really good ...

Tackling child abuse in Africa with research and fun

date 18 hours ago

In one of South Africa's poorest areas, an imaginative new parenting programme is tackling the physical and emotional abuse of children. Oxford University's Vice-Chancellor, Professor Andrew Hamilton, travelled ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.