Psychological factors impact upper-extremity disability

January 25, 2013
Psychological factors impact upper-extremity disability
Psychological factors, including kinesiophobia and catastrophic thinking, are important predictors of the magnitude of upper-extremity-specific disability, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

(HealthDay)—Psychological factors, including kinesiophobia and catastrophic thinking, are important predictors of the magnitude of upper-extremity-specific disability, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Soumen Das De, M.D., M.P.H., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted an observational, cross-sectional study involving 319 patients with upper-extremity-specific disability to examine the effect of kinesiophobia and perceived partner support. Data were collected from the of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and surveys measuring symptoms of depression, pain anxiety, catastrophic thinking, kinesiophobia, and perceived level of support from a partner or significant other.

The researchers found that DASH scores were significantly better for men than women, and were also significantly affected by diagnosis, marital status, and employment status. There was a significant correlation between DASH score and depressive symptoms, catastrophic thinking, kinesiophobia, and pain anxiety, but not with perceived partner support. Sex, diagnosis, employment status, catastrophic thinking, and kinesiophobia were included in the best multivariable model of factors associated with greater arm-specific disability (as measured by DASH), accounting for 55 percent of the variation.

"In this sample, kinesiophobia and catastrophic thinking were the most important predictors of upper-extremity-specific disability in a model that accounted for symptoms of depression, anxiety, and pathophysiology (diagnosis) and explained more than half of the variation in disability," write the authors. "The consistent and predominant role of several modifiable in disability suggests that patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that optimizes mindset and coping strategies."

One or more of the authors or their institution disclosed financial ties with an entity in the biomedical arena.

Explore further: Discrepancy between disease activity, disability in early RA

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Patient-Rated elbow evaluation most responsive instrument

June 18, 2012

(HealthDay) -- The Patient-Rated Elbow Evaluation form (PREE) is the most responsive instrument to identify and quantify elbow joint-specific changes before and after total elbow arthroplasty, according to a study published ...

Prolonged disability predictors identified for low back pain

June 28, 2012

(HealthDay) -- In patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (LBP), impaired fasting glucose tolerance, greater pain-related disability, higher body mass index, and lower quality of life (QoL) at baseline are all associated ...

Pain, disability don't predict function in spinal stenosis

July 16, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), subjective measures of pain and disability have limited ability to predict real-life ambulatory performance, according to a study published in the July 1 issue ...

Recommended for you

Scientists program robot for 'soft tissue' surgery

May 5, 2016

Not even the surest surgeon's hand is quite as steady and consistent as a robotic arm built of metal and plastic, programmed to perform the same motions over and over. So could it handle the slippery stuff of soft tissues ...

Outside the body, a heart beats via life-saving system

September 1, 2015

(Medical Xpress)—A system that enables heart transplants involving hearts that stopped beating in the donor's body continues to save lives. The Organ Care System (OCS) has been used in UK hospitals with good results.

Pig hearts may save human lives: researchers

April 5, 2016

One day, cardiac patients may enjoy a new lease on life with pig hearts beating in their chests, said researchers reporting a major advance Tuesday in cross-species organ transplantation.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.