After school shooting, Conn. debates mental health

January 29, 2013 by Dave Collins

(AP)—Connecticut lawmakers are reviewing mental health care following the Newtown school shooting, even though they and the public have little insight into what might have been ailing the 20-year-old gunman.

A prosecutor says he cannot release any information about Adam Lanza's mental health because of state conduct rules for attorneys.

His office is reviewing whether details of Lanza's mental state can be released to the public after the is completed, possibly in June.

A legislative panel on Tuesday took testimony on potential changes to the state's mental health system.

State Rep. DebraLee Hovey says she and others who represent Newtown are "nervous about different conversations occurring without all of the information." But she says it's never too soon to analyze the system.

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