Sclerostin linked to vascular disease in type 2 diabetes

January 28, 2013
Sclerostin linked to vascular disease in type 2 diabetes
Circulating levels of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor sclerostin are higher in patients with type 2 diabetes who also have atherosclerotic disease, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Circulating levels of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor sclerostin are higher in patients with type 2 diabetes who also have atherosclerotic disease, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in Diabetes Care.

Noting that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is related to the pathology of various diseases, Sonia Morales-Santana, Ph.D., from the Hospital Universitario San Cecilio in Granada, Spain, and colleagues measured serum sclerostin levels in 78 patients with mellitus, of whom 44 had atherosclerotic disease.

The researchers found that patients with atherosclerotic disease had significantly higher serum sclerostin levels, with a 4 percent increase in the risk of atherosclerotic disease for each 1 pmol/L increase in sclerostin. A sclerostin cut-off of 42.3 pmol/L could detect an increased risk of atherosclerotic disease with a sensitivity of 69 percent and a specificity of 54.8 percent. Higher sclerostin levels were associated with abnormal intima-media thickness and aortic calcification in both men and women, and with carotid plaques in men only. Homocysteine levels and intima-media thickness were positively correlated with sclerostin.

"Circulating sclerostin is increased in patients with ," Morales-Santana and colleagues conclude.

Explore further: Even minor physical activity may benefit bone health in premenopausal women

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Cadmium linked to plaque development in older women

July 31, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Cadmium levels in blood and urine are independently associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques in older women, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Fetuin-A levels linked to cardiovascular disease risk

January 8, 2013

(HealthDay)—In elderly individuals without type 2 diabetes, high levels of fetuin-A, a protein that inhibits arterial calcification and insulin action, is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, according ...

Long-term cardiac effects for childhood cancer survivors

March 7, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Regardless of exposure to cardiotoxic cancer therapies, survivors of childhood cancers display cardiovascular abnormalities and have markers of increased systemic inflammation and atherosclerotic disease, according ...

Aspirin enhances platelet isoprostanes in type 2 diabetes

March 23, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are treated with aspirin, isoprostanes are overproduced, which is linked with enhanced platelet recruitment, according to a study published online March ...

Recommended for you

New theory on how insulin resistance, metabolic disease begin

September 26, 2016

Does eating too much sugar cause type 2 diabetes? The answer may not be simple, but a study published Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation adds to growing research linking excessive sugar consumption—specifically ...

Unique molecular atlas of pancreas produced

September 23, 2016

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to produce the first molecular map of the genes that are active in the various cells of the human pancreas. They have also revealed differences in genetic activity between ...

Can long naps cause diabetes?

September 14, 2016

A study presented at a scientific congress Thursday reported a link between long naps and a higher risk of diabetes, though it couldn't say if daytime sleeping was a symptom or a cause.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.