ACR supports patients' access to treatments act of 2013

ACR supports patients' access to treatments act of 2013
The American College of Rheumatology has joined the Coalition for Accessible Treatments, in support of the Patients' Access to Treatments Act of 2013, which will reduce the out-of-pocket expenses for medications, including biologics.

(HealthDay)—The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has joined the Coalition for Accessible Treatments, in support of the Patients' Access to Treatments Act of 2013, which will reduce the out-of-pocket expenses for medications, including biologics.

Noting that some are placing biologics in "specialty tiers," which require patients to pay 20 to 50 percent of , Rep. David B. McKinley (R-WV) and Rep. Lois Capps (D-Calif.) have reintroduced legislation to limit cost-sharing requirements for medications placed in these tiers, increasing accessibility by decreasing excessive out-of-pocket expenses.

The Patients' Access to Treatments Act of 2013 is supported by the Coalition for Accessible Treatments, which is encouraging patients and physicians to ask lawmakers to support and cosponsor the act. The American College of Rheumatology is one of 18 member organizations that have joined the coalition.

"Biologics are essential tools used to fight the progression of and prevent disability," Audrey Uknis, M.D., president of the American College of Rheumatology, said in a statement. "The ACR is encouraged that Reps. McKinley and Capps have reintroduced this important bill and continue to advocate that patients with should have access to live-saving treatments."

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