Low adiponectin in first trimester linked to GDM

Low adiponectin in first trimester linked to GDM
Low adiponectin levels during the first trimester of pregnancy correlate with a higher level of insulin resistance and an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus, according to research published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Low adiponectin levels during the first trimester of pregnancy correlate with a higher level of insulin resistance and an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to research published online Jan. 8 in Diabetes Care.

Marilyn Lacroix, of the University of Sherbrooke in Canada, and colleagues conducted a prospective study to examine the correlation between adiponectin levels, measured in 445 pregnant women during the first and second trimesters, and (1) the risk of developing GDM and (2) insulin resistance/sensitivity, β-cell function, and compensation indices.

The researchers found that 38 women developed GDM. For these women, first trimester adiponectin levels were significantly lower than for women with normal . After adjustment for and glycated hemoglobin, the odds of developing GDM were significantly increased with lower adiponectin levels in the first trimester (odds ratio, 1.12 for each 1 µg/mL decrease in adiponectin). Adiponectin levels in the first and second trimester were significantly linked to insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity, but were not associated with β-cell function or .

"Low adiponectin levels already present at first trimester are likely a reflection of preexisting insulin resistance, which predisposes those women to develop GDM later in pregnancy if they have an insufficient β-cell capacity to respond to the increased demand related to pregnancy," the authors write. "We hope that better understanding of the pathophysiology of during pregnancy and of pathways involved in GDM development will lead to adapted preventive approaches to improve the health of mothers and offspring in the future."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Gestational diabetes, obesity impact pregnancy outcomes

date Mar 02, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who are obese have significantly higher odds of adverse pregnancy outcomes, according to findings from the multinational Hyperglycemia and Adverse ...

Recommended for you

Faster heart rate linked to diabetes risk

date May 22, 2015

An association between resting heart rate and diabetes suggests that heart rate measures could identify individuals with a higher future risk of diabetes, according to an international team of researchers.

EBV co-infection may boost malaria mortality in childhood

date May 21, 2015

Many people who live in sub-Saharan Africa develop a natural immunity to malaria, through repeated exposure to Plasmodium parasites. Even so, the disease kills close to half a million children per year, according ...

Three important things you didn't know about diabetes

date May 21, 2015

When we think of diabetes, we tend to think of rich people with poor lifestyles. A chronic disease linked with obesity, heart disease and worse outcomes for some infectious diseases, diabetes tends to be ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.