New rules aim to get rid of junk foods in schools

by Mary Clare Jalonick

Almost all candy, high-calorie drinks and greasy meals could soon be on a food blacklist in the nation's schools.

For the first time, the government is proposing broad new standards to make sure all foods sold in schools are more healthful.

Under new rules that the Agriculture Department proposed Friday, fatty chips, snack cakes, nachos and mozzarella sticks would be out when it comes to lunch lines and vending machines.

What sorts of foods are "in"? Baked chips, trail mix, , lower-calorie and low-fat hamburgers.

The new rules, required under a child nutrition law passed by Congress in 2010, are part of the government's effort to combat .

The Agriculture Department would set fat, calorie, sugar and sodium limits on almost all foods sold in schools.

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