More complications for inpatient lumbar discectomy

More complications for inpatient lumbar discectomy
Patients undergoing inpatient lumbar discectomy have significantly higher overall complication rates than those treated as outpatients, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

(HealthDay)—Patients undergoing inpatient lumbar discectomy have significantly higher overall complication rates than those treated as outpatients, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

Andrew J. Pugely, M.D., from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues compared the incidence of complications within 30 days in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy (2005 to 2010) in the inpatient and outpatient setting. Data were reviewed for 4,310 patients identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical database.

The researchers found that 61.7 percent of patients underwent an inpatient hospital stay after surgery and 38.3 percent had outpatient surgery. Those undergoing inpatient surgeries had significantly higher unadjusted overall complication rates (6.5 versus 3.5 percent). The complication rate remained significantly higher even after propensity score matching (5.4 versus 3.5 percent; P = 0.0068) and in multivariate logistic regression (odds ratio, 1.52). Independent risk factors for short-term complication after lumbar discectomy included age, diabetes, presence of preoperative wound infection, , operative time, and an inpatient hospital stay.

"After adjusting for confounders using propensity score matching and multivariate , patients undergoing outpatient lumbar discectomy had lower overall complication rates than those treated as inpatients," the authors write. "Surgeons should consider outpatient surgery for lumbar discectomy in appropriate candidates."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Oxiplex improves outcomes after lumbar discectomy

Apr 24, 2012

(HealthDay) -- The use of Oxiplex gel (containing carboxymethylcellulose, polyethylene oxide, and calcium) to coat the surgical site during discectomy procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation ...

Surgeon experience affects complication rate of spinal stenosis surgery

Jun 07, 2012

For patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis, the risk of complications is higher when the surgeon performs very few such procedures—less than four per year, suggests a study in the June issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeon ...

Spinal fusion surgery not associated with stroke

Dec 10, 2012

(HealthDay)—Undergoing spinal fusion surgery does not affect the risk of stroke within the three years after surgery, according to a study published in the December issue of the European Spine Journal.

Recommended for you

Thyroid disease risk varies among blacks, Asians, and whites

14 hours ago

An analysis that included active military personnel finds that the rate of the thyroid disorder Graves disease is more common among blacks and Asian/Pacific Islanders compared with whites, according to a study in the April ...

The key to easy asthma diagnosis is in the blood

17 hours ago

Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma.

Younger adults hit hardest this flu season

19 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The H1N1 flu was the predominant influenza strain in the United States this year, but it packed a lot less punch than in 2009 when it caused a worldwide pandemic, health officials report.

User comments