Study shows cost-effectiveness and benefits to patients of early hip replacement

Study shows cost-effectiveness and benefits to patients of early hip replacement
Hip pain means some patients are unable to lead an active lifestyle.

Early access to hip replacement is cost-effective and provides significant benefits for patients' quality of life, a study has shown.

Ruben Mujica-Mota, from the University of Exeter Medical School, carried out research comparing early access and delayed in Italy on behalf of the European Health Technology Institute for Socio-Economic Research (EHTI).

His findings, which are now published in the journal Value in Health, demonstrate both the cost-effectiveness of early hip replacement, as well as the benefits for patients.

The expert says that delaying hip replacement surgery does not cut costs for health services and denies patients the opportunity to lead an active and healthy life while awaiting surgery.

He claims that even do not benefit from postponing treatment - an approach that is sometimes taken to reduce the risk of revision surgery during their lifetime.

Ruben Mujica-Mota, senior lecturer in at the University of Exeter, concluded: "This research clearly suggests that the cost savings to national health systems in Europe brought about by delaying total hip replacement may not justify the large quality of life losses to patients."

Yves Verboven, executive director of the EHTI, said that delaying hip replacement among patients with severe has "limited value in reducing the total cost of treatment".

He added: "On the contrary, a strategy of not postponing total hip replacement surgery provides a significant benefit to patients."

A spokeswoman for Arthritis Research UK said: "You won't necessarily need a if you have arthritis of the hip, but it is worth considering if your hip is severely damaged by arthritis and the pain, disability and stiffness are having serious effects on your daily activities."

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Total hip replacement surgery may increase risk of stroke

Nov 08, 2012

Risk of ischemic stroke increases by nearly 4.7-fold and hemorrhagic stroke 4.4-fold during the first two weeks after total hip replacement surgery, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. ...

HRT increases likelihood of hip and knee replacement

Oct 28, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Having more children and using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the likelihood that women will have joint replacement surgery, a large Oxford University-led study has shown.

Recommended for you

Breakthrough could prevent hip implant replacement

8 hours ago

Hip implants rely on the normal functioning of bone cells to achieve fixation of the implant with the bone. However, small metal particles released from hip implants, due to friction between the moving surfaces, ...

Ultrasound can accurately diagnose carpal tunnel

12 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Ultrasound can accurately confirm the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a study published in the Sept. 3 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

User comments