Costs up with failure to thrive planned weekend admissions

Costs up with failure to thrive planned weekend admissions
Scheduled failure to thrive admissions on weekends are associated with increased length of stay and health care costs compared with admissions of similar complexity on weekdays, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Scheduled failure to thrive (FTT) admissions on weekends are associated with increased length of stay (LOS) and health care costs compared with admissions of similar complexity on weekdays, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Pediatrics.

To assess whether admission day of the week impacts LOS and health care costs for FTT, Rachel T. Thompson, M.D., from Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, and colleagues analyzed administrative data for all 23,332 children aged younger than 2 years with a primary admission diagnosis of FTT, from 2003 to 2011, from 42 freestanding U.S. hospitals.

The researchers found that increased LOS and increased average costs were significantly associated with weekend admission; this finding was also seen for children with admission and discharge diagnoses of FTT. There was no significant difference in the number of procedures for children admitted on the weekend or on weekdays. There were significantly more radiologic studies (incident rate ratio [IRR], 1.13) and (IRR, 1.39) performed for weekend admissions. Based on 2010 data, if one-half of weekend admissions with both admission and discharge diagnoses of FTT were converted to Monday admissions, $534,145 total savings would have been realized.

"Planned FTT admissions should, when feasible, be scheduled for weekday admission to decrease both health care costs and LOS," write the authors. "In most cases we believe savings from this simple adjustment could be recouped without a change in ."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

PCV13 recommended for 6- to 18-year-olds at high risk

16 minutes ago

(HealthDay)—Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 (PCV13) should be administered to certain children aged 6 through 18 years who are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), according to a policy ...

Brain abnormality found in group of SIDS cases

Nov 25, 2014

More than 40 percent of infants in a group who died of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) were found to have an abnormality in a key part of the brain, researchers report. The abnormality affects the hippocampus, ...

Eczema cases rising among US children

Nov 24, 2014

(HealthDay)—A growing number of children are being diagnosed with the allergic skin condition eczema—but it can usually be eased with topical treatments, according to a new report.

Adult-sized ATVs deadly for kids, report shows

Nov 24, 2014

(HealthDay)—Santa might think twice about giving kids an all-terrain vehicle this year. Riding ATVs poses high risks of injury or death for children and teens, with dangers differing by age, a new U.S. ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.