Family seeks answers in Down Syndrome son's death

February 19, 2013 by David Dishneau

(AP)—A lawyer for the family of a man with Down syndrome who died while being escorted from a movie theater says the grieving family is seeking answers after the death, which was ruled a homicide.

Twenty-six-year-old Robert Ethan Saylor died Jan. 12 after security guards tried to remove him from a Maryland theater where he had finished watching a movie and was refusing to leave. Joseph Espo, an attorney representing the family, said Tuesday the family is still in shock.

The Sheriff's Office previously said Saylor resisted arrest and was handcuffed as he was led out. Saylor then began having what officials described as a medical emergency. He was taken to a hospital, where he died.

Officials said Friday the state medical examiner's office had ruled the a .

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