Medroxyprogesterone acetate linked to immune suppression

February 1, 2013
Medroxyprogesterone acetate linked to immune suppression
Use of the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, common in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa with high HIV-1 prevalence, is associated with suppression of the immune response, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Endocrinology.

(HealthDay)—Use of the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), common in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa with high HIV-1 prevalence, is associated with suppression of the immune response, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Endocrinology.

Noting that observational studies indicate a correlation between hormonal contraceptives and acquisition and transmission of HIV-1, Richard P.H. Huijbregts, from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues examined the effect of MPA and other hormones on innate and adaptive immune mechanisms.

The researchers found that, in and activated T cells, MPA inhibited many cytokines and chemokines, including interferon (IFN)-γ and (TNF)-α. produced less IFN-γ and TNF-α in response to ligands to several Toll-like receptors after MPA treatment. Use of depot MPA was associated with lower levels of IFN-γ in plasma and genital secretions. Lastly, the investigators found that MPA treatment blocked the down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 after T cell activation and increased replication of HIV-1 in activated .

"The presented results suggest that MPA suppresses both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system resulting in a reduction of host resistance to invading pathogens," Huijbregts and colleagues conclude.

Explore further: Scientists disarm HIV in step towards vaccine

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Scientists disarm HIV in step towards vaccine

September 19, 2011

Researchers have found a way to prevent HIV from damaging the immune system, in a new lab-based study published in the journal Blood. The research, led by scientists at Imperial College London and Johns Hopkins University, ...

Hide-and-seek: Altered HIV can't evade immune system

September 28, 2011

(Medical Xpress) -- Researchers at Johns Hopkins have modified HIV in a way that makes it no longer able to suppress the immune system. Their work, they say in a report published online September 19 in the journal Blood, ...

New HIV-inhibiting protein identified

May 29, 2012

Scientists have identified a new HIV-suppressing protein in the blood of people infected with the virus. In laboratory studies, the protein, called CXCL4 or PF-4, binds to HIV such that it cannot attach to or enter a human ...

Recommended for you

Watch immune cells 'glue' broken blood vessels back together

May 3, 2016

As we age, tiny blood vessels in the brain stiffen and sometimes rupture, causing "microbleeds." This damage has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline, but whether the brain can naturally repair ...

Allergies induced by dust mites can harm DNA in lung cells

May 3, 2016

House dust mites, which are a major source of allergens in house dust, can cause asthma in adults and children. Researchers from MIT and the National University of Singapore have now found that these mites have a greater ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.