Minimally invasive, open hemilaminectomy equivalent

February 6, 2013
Minimally invasive, open hemilaminectomy equivalent
Minimally invasive and open multilevel hemilaminectomy are similar with respect to cost and improved quality of life measures for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

(HealthDay)—Minimally invasive (MIS) and open multilevel hemilaminectomy are similar with respect to cost and improved quality of life measures for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Scott L. Parker, M.D., from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a two-year cost-utility study for 54 consecutive patients with lumbar stenosis undergoing multilevel hemilaminectomy through an MIS paramedian tubular approach or midline open approach (27 patients in each group). After two years, total back-related medical resource utilization, missed work, and health state values (quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) were assessed. The direct costs (resource use multiplied by unit costs based on Medicare national allowable payment amounts) and indirect costs (work-day losses multiplied by the self-reported gross-of-tax wage rate) were assessed.

The researchers found that, two years after surgery, MIS and open hemilaminectomy were associated with an equivalent cumulative gain of 0.72 QALYs. MIS and open hemilaminectomy were similar with respect to mean direct medical costs, indirect societal costs, and total two-year cost ($23,109 and $25,420, respectively; P = 0.21). Total costs and utility were similar for the MIS versus open approach.

"MIS versus open multilevel hemilaminectomy was associated with similar cost over two years while providing equivalent improvement in QALYs," the authors write. "In our experience, MIS versus open multilevel hemilaminectomy techniques are equally effective at long-term pain relief and provide equivalent benefit in long-term functional capacity and ."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Minimally invasive esophagectomy offers benefits

May 1, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Compared with open transthoracic esophagectomy, minimally invasive transthoracic esophagectomy is associated with significantly fewer pulmonary infections and with other short-term benefits in patients with ...

Robotic-assisted prostate cancer surgery drives up costs

May 23, 2012

In one of the most comprehensive analyses to date of the cost of robotic-assisted, laparoscopic surgery for prostate cancer, researchers at UPMC found that this now-dominant surgical approach is significantly more costly ...

Cell saver not cost-effective in single-level lumbar surgery

October 15, 2012

(HealthDay)—Use of intraoperative blood salvage (cell saver) is not cost-effective for adult patients undergoing single-level posterior lumbar decompression and fusion (PLDF) surgery, according to research published online ...

Recommended for you

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

July 21, 2015

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

Lack of knowledge on animal disease leaves humans at risk

July 20, 2015

Researchers from the University of Sydney have painted the most detailed picture to date of major infectious diseases shared between wildlife and livestock, and found a huge gap in knowledge about diseases which could spread ...

IBD genetically similar in Europeans and non-Europeans

July 20, 2015

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.