Rivaroxaban found noninferior to enoxaparin in acutely ill

Rivaroxaban found noninferior to enoxaparin in acutely ill
In acutely ill hospitalized patients, standard-duration rivaroxaban has similar efficacy as enoxaparin in reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism, while extended-duration rivaroxaban has superior efficacy, according to a study published in the Feb. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—In acutely ill hospitalized patients, standard-duration rivaroxaban has similar efficacy as enoxaparin in reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism, while extended-duration rivaroxaban has superior efficacy, according to a study published in the Feb. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Alexander T. Cohen, M.D., from King's College Hospital in London, and colleagues randomly assigned 8,101 patients (40 years of age and older) with reduced mobility and an acute requiring hospitalization to receive subcutaneous (40 mg once daily) for 10 days and oral placebo for 35 days, or subcutaneous placebo for 10 days and oral rivaroxaban (10 mg once daily) for 35 days.

At day 10, the researchers found that 2.7 percent of the rivaroxaban group and 2.7 percent of the enoxaparin group experienced asymptomatic proximal or symptomatic venous (relative risk, 0.97; P = 0.003 for non-inferiority). At day 35, 4.4 percent of the rivaroxaban group and 5.7 percent of the enoxaparin group experienced this outcome (relative risk, 0.77; P = 0.02). Major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding occurred in a significantly greater percentage of the rivaroxaban group both at day 10 (2.8 versus 1.2 percent) and at day 35 (4.1 versus 1.7 percent).

"The efficacy of standard-duration rivaroxaban was similar to that of enoxaparin, whereas the efficacy of extended-duration rivaroxaban was superior to that of enoxaparin," Cohen and colleagues conclude. "However, rivaroxaban was associated with an increased risk of clinically relevant bleeding."

The study was funded by Bayer, manufacturer of rivaroxaban, and Janssen, marketer of rivaroxaban; several authors disclosed to pharmaceutical companies, including Bayer and Janssen.

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Stroke risk high when anti-clotting drugs stopped

Apr 25, 2012

Some patients with irregular heartbeats who are taken off anti-clotting medication face a high risk of stroke or blood clotting within a month, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association's Emerging ...

Recommended for you

Senegal closes border as UN warns on Ebola flare-up

28 minutes ago

Senegal has become the latest country to seal its border with a west African neighbour to ward off the deadly Ebola virus, as the new UN pointman on the epidemic said preparations must be made for a possible flare-up of the ...

Climate change could see dengue fever come to Europe

39 minutes ago

Dengue fever could make headway in popular European holiday destinations if climate change continues on its predicted trajectory, according to research published in open access journal BMC Public Health.

American Ebola doc: 'I am thrilled to be alive'

8 hours ago

Calling it a "miraculous day," an American doctor infected with Ebola left his isolation unit and warmly hugged his doctors and nurses on Thursday, showing the world that he poses no public health threat ...

User comments