Self-rated health measure can predict outcomes in knee OA

February 15, 2013
Self-rated health measure can predict outcomes in knee OA
For patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, a single-item measure of self-rated health can be used to predict mental and social health outcomes, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

(HealthDay)—For patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), a single-item measure of self-rated health can be used to predict mental and social health outcomes, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Daniel L. Riddle, P.T., Ph.D., and Levent Dumenci, Ph.D., of the Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, evaluated (in a multicenter observational study) the influence of self-rated health, as assessed with a simple, single-item measure, on physical, mental, and social health in a cohort of 1,127 individuals with symptomatic knee OA from the Initiative study. Participants were followed for a three-year period.

The researchers found that previous self-rated health predicted current mental and social health, while prior social health was predictive of current self-rated health. Furthermore, changes in mental and social health were mediated by self-rated health. Self-rated health mediated changes only in social health over all time periods studied.

"In conclusion, our study demonstrates the potential utility of self-rated health assessments for persons with symptomatic knee OA in clinical settings," the authors write. "Our study suggests that a simple-to-use single-item self-rated health measure is predictive of future health status and mediates changes in both mental and social health."

The Osteoarthritis Initiative Study was sponsored by various pharmaceutical companies.

Explore further: Walking speed is a marker for knee osteoarthritis

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