SUVmax provides valuable indicator of progression-free survival in stage I NSCLC patients

SUVmax (Maximum Standardized Uptake Value) may be a significant and clinically independent marker to indicate progression-free survival in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), according to research being presented at the 2013 Cancer Imaging and Radiation Therapy Symposium. This Symposium is sponsored by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the Radiological Society of North American (RSNA).

SUVmax is measured via PET/CT scan after patients have been injected with radioactive sugar (glucose). Quantifying the SUV of suspicious lesions can aid the identification of early stage tumors because cells that take in greater than normal amounts of radioactive glucose have a higher likelihood of being . The highest concentration of radioactive glucose represents SUVmax. Previous studies have been able to correlate SUVmax to the growth rate of tumors, which indicates that tumors with higher SUVmax will more likely be more rapidly growing and will therefore be tumors that are more difficult to treat, may recur or may metastasize more frequently.

This study included 95 medically inoperable NSCLC patients from October 2005 through May 2011, with a median age of 77 years. All patients had peripheral tumors, and no patient had been previously treated for lung cancer. Prior to SBRT treatment, all patients had an PET/CT scan with documented pretreatment SUVmax assessment. SBRT fractionation was 60 Gy in three (3) fractions with a median treatment time of six days (range of three to 21 days). With a median follow-up of 15 months, median overall survival was 25.3 months and progression-free survival was 40.3 months. Tumor control, overall and progression-free survival were derived utilizing the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to determine whether SUVmax, age, Karnofsky Performance Status, gender, tumor size/T-stage or smoking history influenced outcomes.

"If SUVmax is assessed prior to , specific strategies could be developed to tailor treatments for patients, which would, in turn, provide them with the best chance at a longer and disease-free survival," said Zachary Horne, a 2013 MD candidate at the George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., the lead study author and a researcher in the department at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. "Accurate anatomical and functional imaging and assessment, such as SUVmax, can help us achieve improved outcomes for patients."

More information: The abstract, "Pretreatment SUVmax as a Marker for Progression-Free Survival in Stage I NSCLC Treated with SBRT," will be presented in detail during a scientific session at 8:00 a.m. Eastern time on Saturday, February 9, 2013.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New breast cancer imaging method promising

1 hour ago

The new PAMmography method for imaging breast cancer developed by the University of Twente's MIRA research institute and the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital appears to be a promising new method that could ...

Palliation is rarely a topic in studies on advanced cancer

1 hour ago

End-of-life aspects, the corresponding terminology, and the relevance of palliation in advanced cancer are often not considered in publications on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This is the result of an analysis by ...

Breast cancer replicates brain development process

1 hour ago

New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.

Is genetic instability the key to beating cancer?

3 hours ago

Cancerous tumors may be poised at the edge of their own destruction, an insight that could help researchers find new, more effective treatments, suggest SFI External Professor Ricard Solé and colleagues in an April 9 paper ...

Phase 3 study may be game-changer for acute myeloid leukemia

7 hours ago

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers say clinical trials for a new experimental drug to treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are very promising. Patients treated with CPX-351, a combination of the chemotherapeutic drugs cytarabine ...

User comments