Cardio risks need evaluation before prescribing statins

March 15, 2013
Cardio risks need evaluation before prescribing statins
Physicians may not adequately consider a patient's cardiovascular risk when prescribing statins as preventive therapy, according to a research letter published online March 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Physicians may not adequately consider a patient's cardiovascular risk when prescribing statins as preventive therapy, according to a research letter published online March 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Michael E. Johansen, M.D., from University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues anonymously surveyed 750 physicians selected randomly from a nationally representative sample of U.S. physicians from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. There were an equal number of family medicine, cardiology, and general internal medicine physicians in the sample. Six vignette-style questions involving patients without and different baseline risks were included in the survey, with vignette numbers three to six including patients who had attempted .

The researchers analyzed 202 usable, returned samples. They found in vignettes one and two that when a woman with diabetes had higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (120 versus 88 mg/dL), statin therapy was recommended significantly more often (94 versus 40.2 percent). In vignettes three and four, significantly more treated a low-risk (LDL-C level of 180 mg/dL) 40-year-old man with well-controlled hypertension (88.9 percent) compared with a low-risk 50-year-old women (73.5 percent). In vignettes five and six, with hypertensive, tobacco-using patients, similar treatment rates were recommended to a 75-year-old man (LDL-C level of 140 mg/dL) compared with a 50-year-old woman (LDL-C level of 145 mg/dL). There were no differences in responses by clinical specialty.

"Overall, our study suggests that physicians may not adequately consider a patient's when prescribing statins in primary prevention," the authors write.

Explore further: Greater drop in LDL seen with atorvastatin plus PCSK9 antibody

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Optimism may reduce risk of dying prematurely among women

December 7, 2016

Having an optimistic outlook on life—a general expectation that good things will happen—may help people live longer, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study found that women ...

New discovery at heart of healthy cereals

December 6, 2016

A new discovery at the University of Queensland could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security – the access to balanced nourishment - globally.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.