Genetic mother wins surrogacy lawsuit in Ireland

The genetic mother of twins born through a surrogate pregnancy has defeated the Irish government in a landmark lawsuit and won the right to be declared the mother on the children's birth certificates.

Ireland had refused the woman's demand to be recorded as the twins' mother, citing its 1937 constitution and its view that the woman who gives birth must be recorded legally as the mother.

Dublin High Court Justice Henry Abbott ruled Tuesday that Ireland's laws governing birth certificates and parentage needed to be updated to reflect the growing use of , and other fertility techniques.

The woman, whose identity was shielded by the court, was declared medically unable to carry her own fertilized embryo. Her sister volunteered to serve as the .

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies

6 hours ago

Dr. Denham Harman, a renowned scientist who developed the most widely accepted theory on aging that's now used to study cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other illnesses, has died in Nebraska at age 98.

Mexican boy who had massive tumor recovering

16 hours ago

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had pieces of a massive tumor removed and who drew international attention after U.S. officials helped him get treatment in the southwestern U.S. state of New Mexico is still recovering after ...

New medical device to make the mines safer

Nov 21, 2014

Dehydration can be a serious health issue for Australia's mining industry, but a new product to be developed with input from Flinders University's Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) is set to more effectively ...

US family gets $6.75 million in Botox case

Nov 20, 2014

A New York couple who said Botox treatment of their son's cerebral palsy left him with life-threatening complications and sued its manufacturer won a $6.75 million verdict from a federal jury on Thursday.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.