Hypospadias not related to organic diet during pregnancy

March 21, 2013
Hypospadias not related to organic diet during pregnancy
Although no obvious relationship between organic diet during pregnancy and hypospadias has been found, frequent consumption of non-organic high-fat dairy products during pregnancy might be associated with increased odds of hypospadias, according to research published in the March issue of Urology.

(HealthDay)—Although no obvious relationship between organic diet during pregnancy and hypospadias has been found, frequent consumption of non-organic high-fat dairy products during pregnancy might be associated with increased odds of hypospadias, according to research published in the March issue of Urology.

Jeppe Schultz Christensen, of the University of South Denmark in Odense, and colleagues evaluated the effects of organic diet during pregnancy and hypospadias in a case-control study conducted in 306 mothers of boys operated on for hypospadias and 306 mothers with healthy boys.

According to the researchers, mothers who never or rarely chose any organic products had non-significant increased odds of giving birth to a boy with hypospadias (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.31; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.78 to 2.21). However, rare choice of organic non-milk dairy products was associated with higher unadjusted odds of to a boy with hypospadias, but this association was not statistically significant after adjustments for confounders (OR, 1.36; 95 percent CI, 0.95 to 1.94). A similar association was observed for mothers rarely or never choosing organic eggs (adjusted OR, 1.28; 95 percent CI, 0.92 to 1.79).

"Maternal choice of the organic alternative to during pregnancy was not associated with hypospadias in the offspring. However, rare choice of organic non-milk dairy products or eggs was associated with , although the difference was not statistically significant," the authors write. "We speculate that conventional may be contaminated with chemicals, possibly lipophilic pesticides with endocrine disrupting abilities."

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