Using internet search logs can help identify drug interactions

Using internet search logs can help identify drug interactions
Search logs can be used to inexpensively mine for anonymized signals that may alert authorities to potential drug interactions and add new Web-scale pharmacovigilance capabilities, according to research published online March 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

(HealthDay)—Search logs can be used to inexpensively mine for anonymized signals that may alert authorities to potential drug interactions and add new Web-scale pharmacovigilance capabilities, according to research published online March 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

Ryen W. White, Ph.D., of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Wash., and colleagues conducted a large-scale study of Web search log data gathered in 2010 to determine whether early clues about a drug's adverse events might emerge from evaluating search terms.

Specifically, the investigators evaluated whether searches for paroxetine and pravastatin could have been used to predict a of . By examining drug pairs that are known to cause hyperglycemia and those that are not associated with hyperglycemia, they were able to determine that search logs can be used to inexpensively mine for anonymized signals that may improve drug safety surveillance.

"Overall, these findings demonstrate the potential value of the log analysis for identifying drug pairs linked to hyperglycemia and illustrate the generalizability of the method beyond just the pravastatin-paroxetine pairing," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

TPN-linked hyperglycemia ups death for non-critically ill

Jan 03, 2013

(HealthDay)—Non-critically ill hospitalized patients who develop hyperglycemia after total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are more than five times more likely to die in the hospital, according to research published ...

Daily exercise doesn't further improve glycemic control

Mar 14, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For individuals with type 2 diabetes, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity endurance exercise once a day or an hour every other day are equally effective for controlling hyperglycemia, according ...

Recommended for you

FDA approves hard-to-abuse narcotic painkiller

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—A new formulation of a powerful narcotic painkiller that discourages potential abusers from snorting or injecting the drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Race affects opioid selection for cancer pain

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Racial disparities exist in the type of opioid prescribed for cancer pain, according to a study published online July 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

FDA approves tough-to-abuse formulation of oxycodone

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term, around-the-clock treatment for severe ...

Tough-to-abuse formulation of oxycodone approved

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term, around-the-clock treatment for severe pain when other ...

EU regulator: Morning-after pill OK for all women

Jul 24, 2014

(AP)—A commonly used morning-after pill is suitable for use by heavier women, the European Medicines Agency said Thursday after a review of the evidence sparked by the French manufacturer's declaration that the drugs didn't ...

User comments