Lowering CT tube voltage for colonography beneficial

March 7, 2013
Lowering CT tube voltage for colonography beneficial
In patients undergoing computed tomography colonography, reducing the tube voltage from 120 kVp to 100 kVp significantly reduces radiation dose while minimally reducing image quality, regardless of patient size, according to a study published in the March issue of Radiology.

(HealthDay)—In patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) colonography, reducing the tube voltage from 120 kVp to 100 kVp significantly reduces radiation dose while minimally reducing image quality, regardless of patient size, according to a study published in the March issue of Radiology.

To examine the effect of a decrease in tube voltage from 120 kVp to 100 kVp in patients undergoing , Kevin J. Chang, M.D., from Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, and colleagues compared , contrast-to-noise ratio, and three-dimensional image quality in 63 patients undergoing CT colonography, with scanning performed in the supine (120 kVp) and prone (100 kVp) positions.

The researchers found that reducing the voltage reduced the volume CT dose index by 20 percent and reduced the dose-length product by 16 percent. There was a 32 percent increase in and an increase in mean attenuation of tagged fluid from 395 to 487 HU, but no net change in the contrast-to-noise ratio of tagged fluid, regardless of patient size. On a scale of 5, image quality fell to 4 from 5.

"A decrease in tube voltage from 120 to 100 kVp results in a significant decrease in radiation dose but only a minimal decrease in three-dimensional at all patient sizes," Chang and colleagues conclude.

One author disclosed financial ties to Siemens; another author is an unpaid consultant to GE Medical Systems.

Explore further: Experts offer pointers for optimizing radiation dose in chest CT

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers discover underlying cause of myeloma

February 11, 2016

Yale Cancer Center researchers have identified what causes a third of all myelomas, a type of cancer affecting plasma cells. The findings, published Feb. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine, could fundamentally change ...

Scientists find leukemia's surroundings key to its growth

February 10, 2016

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a type of cancer found primarily in children can grow only when signaled to do so by other nearby cells that are noncancerous. The finding, published in ...

Study examines evolution of cancer

February 8, 2016

A novel Yale study answers age-old questions about how cancers spread by applying tools from evolutionary biology. The new insights will help scientists better understand the genetic origins of tumor metastases, and lead ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.