Oral melatonin has no effect on appetite in advanced cancer

Oral melatonin has no effect on appetite in advanced cancer
Oral melatonin does not improve appetite, weight, or quality of life for patients with cachexia due to advanced cancer, according to research published online Feb. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—Oral melatonin does not improve appetite, weight, or quality of life for patients with cachexia due to advanced cancer, according to research published online Feb. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

In an effort to determine whether may be associated with appetite improvement in patients with cancer cachexia, Egidio Del Fabbro, M.D., of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues performed a randomized, double-blind, 28-day trial of melatonin 20 mg versus placebo in 48 patients with advanced lung or .

This study was closed for futility after the interim analysis was performed and results suggested that, even with a larger sample size, the results were not likely to change. No significant difference was observed between melatonin- and placebo-treated groups with regard to appetite, other symptoms, weight, score on the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy questionnaire, toxicity, or survival.

"In cachectic patients with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer, oral melatonin 20 mg at night did not improve appetite, weight, or quality of life compared with placebo," the authors write. "More research is required to determine whether melatonin has a role in the supportive care of patients earlier in their disease ."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Heavy lifting for cancer research

Feb 09, 2012

Many patients with advanced cancer suffer from cachexia, a condition also called body-wasting or wasting syndrome, which causes significant weight loss, extreme fatigue and reduces quality of life.

Prophylaxis with apixaban feasible for cancer patients

Mar 29, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Primary venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with apixaban, an oral direct Factor Xa inhibitor, in ambulatory cancer patients undergoing first- or second-line chemotherapy for advanced or metastatic ...

Making headway on beta-blockers and sleep

Sep 28, 2012

Over 20 million people in the United States take beta-blockers, a medication commonly prescribed for cardiovascular issues, anxiety, hypertension and more. Many of these same people also have trouble sleeping, a side effect ...

L-carnitine does not reduce cancer-related fatigue

Sep 18, 2012

(HealthDay)—Patients with invasive malignancies who take L-carnitine supplements do not experience a reduction in fatigue, pain, or depression, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of ...

Recommended for you

Why we should vaccinate boys against HPV as well as girls

1 hour ago

Gillian Prue, from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Queen's University of Belfast, says that the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is common in men and can lead to genital warts and the development of some head and ...

Generation of tanners see spike in deadly melanoma

13 hours ago

(AP)—Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.

Penn team makes cancer glow to improve surgical outcomes

13 hours ago

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence.

User comments