People with mental illness make up large share of US smokers

People with mental illness make up large share of U.S smokers
Report also found higher proportion of smoking among substance abusers.

(HealthDay)—Adults with a mental illness or a substance-abuse disorder represent about 25 percent of the U.S. population but account for nearly 40 percent of all cigarettes smoked in the country, according to a new study.

The researchers also said that the smoking rate among adults aged 18 and older with a or substance-abuse disorder is about 38 percent, compared with just under 20 percent for those without these conditions.

This means that the current rate of smoking among adults with a mental illness or a substance-abuse disorder is 94 percent higher than among adults without the disorders, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Administration (SAMHSA) report.

Adults with substance-abuse disorders but not mental illness represent about 5 percent of the population, but smoke nearly 9 percent of all cigarettes. Those with both a mental illness and a substance-use disorder represent roughly 4 percent of the population, but smoke 9.5 percent of all cigarettes.

"It has long been a public-health priority to develop effective and cessation programs," SAMHSA Administrator Pamela Hyde said in a government news release.

"This report highlights a clear disparity. It shows that people dealing with mental illness or substance-abuse issues smoke more and are less likely to quit," she said. "We need to continue to strengthen efforts to figure out what works to reduce and prevent smoking for people with mental-health conditions."

The report findings are based on data from SAMHSA's 2009 to 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

SAMHSA and the Leadership Center have launched the 100 Pioneers for , which provides support for mental-health and substance-abuse treatment groups and facilities to help patients quit smoking.

More information: The American Cancer Society offers a guide to quitting smoking.

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Lurker2358
1 / 5 (1) Mar 20, 2013
"It has long been a public-health priority to develop effective smoking prevention and cessation programs," SAMHSA Administrator Pamela Hyde said in a government news release.


Not really. The government policy has been to put a surgeon General's warning on it, and pass the medical bills and other societal costs on to future generations.

Cigarettes were known to be cancerous since well before I was even born.

If Asbestos manufacturers can still be sued, why can't I sue cigarette smokers and tobacco farmers and cigarette makers for repeatedly, knowingly, intentionally exposing me to this deadly toxin, and even pressuring me to use it?

It's really simple to stop this.

Ban cigarettes.

Of course there's always smuggling and such, but that's greatly reduced compared to current levels. Then you just arrest people and put their poisoning asses in jail when you catch them.

No amount of increased taxes on cigarettes will justify the harm they cause.

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