Proportion of black males in US medical schools dropping

Proportion of black males in U.S. medical schools dropping
The proportion of black males in medical school is decreasing, according to a report published by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

(HealthDay)—The proportion of black males in medical school is decreasing, according to a report published by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

Researchers from the AAMC examined medical education diversity, focusing on .

According to the report, in 2011, 2.5 percent of medical school applicants were black men, a decrease from 2.6 percent in 2002. During the same period the proportion of Asian and Hispanic male applicants increased by 9 and 11 percent, respectively. Black women accounted for two-thirds of black medical school students, and 63 percent of new black doctors in 2011 were women. During the last decade there was a 3 percent increase in the total number of male African-American medical school graduates, but the proportion of new black decreased from 2.6 percent in 2002 to 2.4 percent in 2011. Only 6 percent of 2011 matriculants were black, as are only 4 percent of practicing doctors, although African-Americans account for 13 percent of the U.S. population. begin early, with women accounting for nearly two-thirds of to earn bachelor's degrees and only 52 percent of male African-Americans earning a , compared with 58 and 78 percent of male Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, respectively.

"We have a major, major problem in this country," Marc Nivet, Ed.D., the AAMC's chief diversity officer, said in a statement. "There is just simply an enormous amount of indisputable evidence that we're not intervening as effectively as we'd like as a society to increase the talent pool of African-Americans who are capable of taking advantage of the science curricula available up and down the pipeline."

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