Tau transmission model opens doors for new Alzheimer's, Parkinson's therapies

March 15, 2013

Injecting synthetic tau fibrils into animal models induces Alzheimer's-like tau tangles and imitates the spread of tau pathology, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego March 16-23, 2013.

This Alzheimer's research, along with additional Parkinson's research from Penn and beyond, further demonstrates the cell-to- of neurodegenerative proteins. John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, co-director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) and professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, will present the research in the Hot Topics plenary session on Tuesday, March 19 starting at 5:15pm.

"The transmission model better explains the spread of disease within neurodegenerative disease, and has uncovered new therapeutic opportunities which we are exploring vigorously," said Dr. Trojanowski. "However, it is important to emphasize that the spread of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's pathology does not mean these diseases are infectious, like , based on data from another recent study from our group."

Explore further: Anti-tau drug improves cognition, decreases tau tangles in Alzheimer's disease models

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