Technology could provide a solution to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, save lives

March 28, 2013
Medtric Biotech LLC founders Sean Connell and Jianming Li are developing a host of disinfectant and wound care products that could be effective against antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. The company received a $150,000 SBIR Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation to continue development. Credit: Purdue Research Park photo

(Medical Xpress)—Through the misuse and overuse of antibiotics, several types of bacteria have become resistant to drugs that were designed to kill them. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that some of these "superbugs" are linked to tens of thousands of deaths in the United States annually, including 14,000 for C. difficile and 19,000 for MRSA.

Technology developed by Purdue University researchers and commercialized through a Purdue Research Park-based firm could be effective against the increased number of antibiotic- of bacteria in the world.

Medtric Biotech LLC, based in the Purdue Research Park, is developing a suite of disinfectant and wound care products that have been shown to be effective against two of the deadliest superbugs: MRSA and VRE. Sean Connell, president and COO, said these and other bacteria are becoming a concern.

"In the United States, the number of deaths attributed to these antibiotic-resistant bacteria rises each year. We see the effects as friends and family members contract serious infections that require hospitalization and drastic treatments," he said. "Our technology has been developed as an alternative option to prevent infection and treat . The results from third-party laboratories are promising, and they continue to motivate our team to develop these products that could save lives."

Medtric Biotech will continue to develop its products through a $150,000 SBIR Phase I grant from the National Science Foundation. The company also is eligible to receive an additional $30,000 Phase IB supplemental fund. Jianming Li, CSO and co-inventor of the technology, said receiving the grant is a significant milestone for the technology.

"The NSF SBIR grant is a competitive and meritorious award, and we are grateful to receive this funding," he said. "Besides the financial resources, the grant validates our commercialization strategy and can be further used to leverage support."

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