Vision loss, depression may be linked, study finds

Vision loss, depression may be linked, study finds
Better recognition of mental health issues warranted, expert says.

(HealthDay)—People with depression are more likely to have self-reported vision loss, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 10,000 adults aged 20 and older who took part in the U.S. and between 2005 and 2008.

The rate of depression was about 11 percent among people with self-reported and about 5 percent among those who did not report vision loss, according to the study, which was published online March 7 in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.

After accounting for a number of factors—including age, sex and —the researchers concluded there was a significant association between self-reported vision loss and depression. The study did not, however, show that one causes the other.

"This study provides further evidence from a national sample to generalize the relationship between depression and vision loss to adults across the age spectrum," said Dr. Xinzhi Zhang, of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and colleagues in a journal news release.

"Better recognition of depression among people reporting reduced ability to perform routine activities of daily living due to vision loss is warranted," they concluded.

More information: Prevent Blindness America outlines signs of eye problems in adults.

Related Stories

Refractive errors affect vision for half of American adults

date Aug 11, 2008

About half of U.S. adults age 20 and older have refractive errors, or eye problems that result in less than 20/20 vision, according to a report in the August issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. ...

Vision loss more common in people with diabetes

date Oct 13, 2008

Visual impairment appears to be more common in people with diabetes than in those without the disease, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Older Americans see better today, study finds

date Jul 20, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Older Americans see better than their parents did in old age, according to a new study that finds visual impairment among the U.S. elderly has declined 58 percent since the 1980s.

Recommended for you

Lowering risk of a major eye disease

date May 20, 2015

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic, progressive disease, is a leading cause of blindness among people aged 65 and older. Vision impairment due to advanced AMD significantly reduces quality ...

Age-related macular degeneration, mortality linked

date May 12, 2015

(HealthDay)—Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a predictor of poor survival, especially among women aged 80 years and older, according to a study published online May 4 in the Journal of the American Ge ...

Short-sightedness becoming more common across Europe

date May 11, 2015

Myopia or short-sightedness is becoming more common across Europe, according to a new study led by King's College London. The meta-analysis of findings from 15 studies by the European Eye Epidemiology Consortium ...

Smart microchips may optimise human vision

date May 11, 2015

To date, chip-based retinal implants have only permitted a rudimentary restoration of vision. However, modifying the electrical signals emitted by the implants could change that. This is the conclusion of ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.