UN says most of world lags on road safety laws

(AP)—The World Health Organization says only 7 percent of the world's population lives in nations where there are adequate road safety laws.

The U.N. agency says only 28 nations have laws that address all of the key risk factors: drunken driving, speeding and failure to use motorcycle helmets, or child restraints.

WHO's report Thursday said more than two-thirds of people live in places with seat belt laws that cover all occupants, and nearly a third are covered by laws requiring child restraints.

It reported that about 1.24 million people worldwide died in road in 2010 and that road traffic injuries are the leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 29.

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