AHA statement: People with congenital heart disease need physical activity

A new scientific statement from the American Heart Associations reminds physicians and people with congenital heart disease that regular physical activity is still important and should be promoted.

(heart structural problems existing since birth) is estimated to affect more than 859,000 children and 850,000 adults in the United States.

According to the statement:

  • While some conditions may require a restriction in physical activity, "for most, physical activity can be unlimited and should be strongly promoted."
  • Most patients with congenital heart disease are relatively sedentary. But the physical, psychological and social health benefits of physical activity are important for this population which is at risk for exercise intolerance, obesity and other diseases, according to the statement.
  • The recommendations for activity promotion are based on general recommendations for physical activity for healthy children and adults because only a limited amount of research on physical activity among congenital heart disease patients has been done.

The statement will be published in Circulation, a journal of the .

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