AMSSM: Autologous stem cells show promise for ACL tears

April 20, 2013
AMSSM: autologous stem cells show promise for ACL tears
For patients with partial or complete non-retracted anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, injection of autologous mesenchymal stem cells directly into the ACL sheath may help heal the tear, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Medical Society of Sports Medicine, held from April 17 to 21 in San Diego.

(HealthDay)—For patients with partial or complete non-retracted anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, injection of autologous mesenchymal stem cells directly into the ACL sheath may help heal the tear, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Medical Society of Sports Medicine, held from April 17 to 21 in San Diego.

Benjamin Newton, M.D., from the Centeno-Schultz Clinic in Broomfield, Colo., and colleagues treated seven patients with partial or complete non-retracted tear ACLs, confirmed by (MRI), to assess the impact of autologous injected directly into the ACL sheath.

The researchers identified radiographic and subjective improvement in five of the seven patients. Three of the five had returned to their pre-injury level of activity. One patient did not respond to therapy and one did not undergo post-procedure imaging.

"Using autologous mesenchymal stem cells injected directly into the ACL sheath results in healing which is appreciated on MRI and improvement of function by patient," the authors write. "The regenerative properties of mesenchymal stem cells in the world of orthopedics [show] promise."

More information: More Information

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