Bushfire smoke poses health risks

Bushfire smoke poses health risks

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers are looking at how smoke from bushfires may pose risks to some people's health.

The first study believed to be conducted during a planned burning season will examine the health impacts of smoke pollution in regional communities across Victoria.

Lead researcher Dr Martine Dennekamp, from Monash University's Department of Epidemiology and , said the study was currently calling for participants from the Yarra Valley region, in particular people living in the Warburton area, to take part in the study during planned burns this month.

"Australia is at increasing risk from bushfires, and planned burning is essential to bushfire management. With increased levels of smoke, it's important to understand how exposure to smoke might affect communities," Dr Dennekamp said.

"We know that healthy people tolerate brief episodes of quite well. Our study is looking for changes in symptoms, lung function and inflammation that could increase risk for people, particularly those with an underlying illness."

The study will provide scope for larger clinical studies into the health impacts of bushfire smoke and inform the development of public and intervention strategies.

"Most studies into the effects of bushfire smoke tend to focus on assessing or emergency presentations alone, but this limits the amount of information about health impacts," Dr Dennekamp said.

"For the first time, exposure to smoke both indoors and outdoors will be assessed and related to health impacts. The results will help public health managers and doctors know what sort of to give healthy people, older people, and people who might have ."

The study will be conducted by Monash University, University of Tasmania and CSIRO during the Autumn season in collaboration with the Victorian Department of Sustainability and Environment, the Bushfire Cooperative Research Centre and the Victorian Department of Health and the Environment Protection Authority.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Living with a smoker may raise blood pressure in boys

May 01, 2011

Exposure to secondhand smoke, even at extremely low levels, is associated with increased blood pressure in boys, according to new research being presented Sunday, May 1, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting ...

Recommended for you

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury (Update)

Apr 18, 2014

About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body ...

Autonomy and relationships among 'good life' goals

Apr 18, 2014

Young adults with Down syndrome have a strong desire to be self-sufficient by living independently and having a job, according to a study into the meaning of wellbeing among young people affected by the disorder.

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

cleanair
not rated yet Apr 10, 2013
I think it is well established how susceptible groups are affected by smoke.
Tasmanian's suffer smoke from the mainland. Perhaps it would be good to include these people in the study.
For health reasons, the best advice would be to stop the smoke at the source surely.