Decreasing KV reduces radiation dose in lumbar spine CT without compromising quality

An algorithm that takes the patient's size into consideration can cut radiation dose by 41% in lumbar spine CT without compromising the diagnostic quality of the images, a new study shows.

Researchers at Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea examined 107 patients using semi-automated attenuation-based tube potential selection which optimized tube potential at 100 kilovoltage, rather than the standard 120 kilovoltage. Decreasing the kilovoltage decreased the from a mean of 21.78 mGy to a mean of 12.77 mGy, but it can increase the image noise (graininess of the image), said Dr. Junghyun Lim, lead author of the study.

The images were reconstructed using either the standard filtered back projection or iterative reconstruction – a technique designed to reduce image noise. Two radiologists reviewed the images and then scored them based on level of noise, visibility of structure and confidence of . They concluded that regardless of the reconstruction method, the lower kilovoltage images were of , said Dr. Lim. "We conducted objective measurements of as well," noted Dr. Lim. The objective measurements favored the images that had undergone iterative reconstruction, he said.

Dr. Lim noted that his facility performs between 140-150 lumbar CT exams each month. Based on the results of this study, "the routine lumbar spine CT exam is now conducted at 100 kilovoltage using filtered back projection, he said.

Dr. Lim's study is part of an electronic exhibit that will be available from April 13-April 19 at the ARRS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Lowering CT tube voltage for colonography beneficial

Mar 07, 2013

(HealthDay)—In patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) colonography, reducing the tube voltage from 120 kVp to 100 kVp significantly reduces radiation dose while minimally reducing image quality, regardless ...

Recommended for you

New medical device to make the mines safer

Nov 21, 2014

Dehydration can be a serious health issue for Australia's mining industry, but a new product to be developed with input from Flinders University's Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) is set to more effectively ...

US family gets $6.75 million in Botox case

Nov 20, 2014

A New York couple who said Botox treatment of their son's cerebral palsy left him with life-threatening complications and sued its manufacturer won a $6.75 million verdict from a federal jury on Thursday.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.