Diabetes-linked autoantibodies may alter children's gut microbes

April 6, 2013
Diabetes-linked autoantibodies may alter children's gut microbes
Children with diabetes-associated autoantibodies have alterations in the gut microbiome, according to a study published in the April issue of Diabetes.

(HealthDay)—Children with diabetes-associated autoantibodies have alterations in the gut microbiome, according to a study published in the April issue of Diabetes.

Marcus C. de Goffau, from the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands, and colleagues compared the intestinal microbiota composition of 18 children with at least two diabetes-linked autoantibodies with 18 autoantibody-negative children matched for age, sex, early feeding history, and risk genotype.

The researchers found that β-cell autoimmunity correlated with a low abundance of lactate-producing and butyrate-producing species. Children with β-cell autoimmunity also exhibited a reduction in Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium psuedocatenulatum, the two most dominant Bifidobacterium species; and an increase in Bacteroides genus. Children with β-cell autoimmunity did not exhibit increased fecal calprotectin or immunoglobulin A as a marker of inflammation.

"Functional studies related to the observed alterations in the gut microbiome are warranted because the low abundance of and -producing species could adversely affect the intestinal epithelial barrier function and inflammation, whereas the apparent importance of the Bacteroides genus in development of is insufficiently understood," the authors write.

Explore further: Gastro illness in infancy linked to islet autoimmunity

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